Are gamblers more likely to commit crimes? An empirical analysis of a nationally representative survey of US young adults

Abstract

We examine the relationship between gambling and criminal behaviour using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health {(Add} Health). Our data set includes survey responses from 6145 young adults. The results of our empirical analysis are consistent with the gambling literature in which it is suggested that higher gambling losses increase the propensity to commit crime. This study complements the current literature, as our data and empirical analysis allow us to control for many variables that have been neglected in previous studies, including various forms of gambling. Our findings provide useful information on the general relationship between gambling behaviour and criminal behaviour. We examine the relationship between gambling and criminal behaviour using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health {(Add} Health). Our data set includes survey responses from 6145 young adults. The results of our empirical analysis are consistent with the gambling literature in which it is suggested that higher gambling losses increase the propensity to commit crime. This study complements the current literature, as our data and empirical analysis allow us to control for many variables that have been neglected in previous studies, including various forms of gambling. Our findings provide useful information on the general relationship between gambling behaviour and criminal behaviour.

Problem with this document? Please report it to us.